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What Is Glycemic Index?

The glycemic index (GI) provides a measure of how quickly blood sugar levels (i.e., levels of glucose in the blood) rise after eating a particular type of food.

The glycemic index (GI) provides a measure of how quickly blood sugar levels (i.e., levels of glucose in the blood) rise after eating a particular type of food.

The Glycemic index was designed 20 years ago when doctors were looking for recommendations around best eating practices for diabetics. In its simplest terms, what this research  revealed was that eating complex carbohydrates (starch) was a far healthier option than consuming simple carbohydrates (sugar) because they take longer to process and digest.

Additionally, “Research has shown that very high glucose levels after meals, called glucose spikes, are damaging to our arteries and various blood vessels, and they promote far too much insulin to be around,” explains McMillan-Price.

Hence the recommendation to consume complex carbohydrates or foods that are ranked ‘low GI” on the Glycemic Index which ranges from 1 to 100.

It is recommended that people with diabetes have moderate amounts of carbohydrate and include high fibre foods that also have a low GI (not all high fibre foods have a low GI). Some research has shown that by eating a diet with a lower GI, people with diabetes can reduce their average blood glucose levels. This is important in reducing the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. – source Diabetes Australia

 

 

The following table gives a values for low, medium and high glycemic load for foods.

  • Low GI = 55 or less (such as walnuts, mushrooms, hummus and coconut sugar)
  • Medium GI = 56 – 69 (such as blueberry muffin, couscous and shredded wheat)
  • High GI = 70 or more (such as french fries, donuts, cornflakes and watermelon)

 

CocoRoselle Coconut Products have avergae GI of 30-45.

Please note* GI numbers are to be used as a guide only as individual foods do not have the same response in all people with diabetes.